Tag Archives: perennial

Lily of the Valley………… sometimes a little bit, is too much!!

Lily of the Valley, along with Liriope and Bishop’s Weed, is another one of those fast spreading invasive perennial plants that seem to constantly overstep their original plant bed boundaries.

Lily of the Valley is a perennial groundcover forming plant we find in more mature landscapes (rarely planted on purpose in modern day gardens) and is known to tolerate extreme environmental conditions (drought, clay soil, etc.).

Lily of the Valley GROWS, and GROWS, and GROWS!!

Lily of the Valley seems to withstand full sun once established, but grows very well in deep shade.

Please be sure to contact our team at Pacocha Landscaping Services, Inc. if you need professional help removing unwanted Lily of the Valley plants or any other stubborn vegetation found overtaking your garden.  Thank you very much for visiting our site and have a great day!

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LIRIOPE…….. Can you please GET THAT PLANT OUT OF HERE!

When walking through shady areas, mainly on older, more mature landscapes, I occasionally notice a very special low-growing perennial that has a tendency to sneak it’s way around a plant bed, even spreading well into adjacent lawn areas.

The persistent perennial I speak of is called liriope (aka Monkey Grass, Lilyturf or Border Grass).

What makes liriope so special is even though it is very small in size, it is very difficult to completely remove and has a tendency to spread (variety dependent).  Complete physical removal usually takes multiple tries, over several years.  Even non-selective liquid herbicides like glyphosate may only be partially effective due to the plants tuberous root system.

 

IT IS VERY COMMON TO FIND LIRIOPE GROWING IN NEW LAWN AREAS THAT WERE ONCE PLANT BEDS!

The moral of my story is this, start removing liriope early.  Begin digging out your unwanted liriope plants now to eventually reclaim precious planting bed space or to clear the way for a new lawn.

Please be sure to contact Pacocha Landscaping Services, Inc. with any questions you may have or if we can be of service to you.  Thank’s for visiting our site and have a great day!

 

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String-Trimmer Contact vs Delicate Exterior Surfaces

As of late, I have been having more and more conversations with both new and existing clients in regard to the possibility of surface damage caused by routine string-trimmer use at their properties.  When mowing a lawn, it is often the case, that any grass found growing on-site, not accessible by a conventional lawn mower will be cut using a mechanical string-trimmer (aka weed-wacker, line trimmer, weed eater, etc).

Unless improved landscape design or protective strategies are employed (targeted wood mulch placement, expanded plant bed areas, use of sacrificial contact materials, simple grass removal, etc.), contact damage is very likely.

When placed/installed directly atop growing grass or are left in very close proximity to a regularly maintained lawn, the following items or structures are commonly exposed to accidental string-trimmer related damage.

 

  • Wood Stairs, Fencing and Gates
  • Deck, Fence and Mail Box Posts
  • Tree Bark/Exposed Roots
  • Wooden or Plastic Children Playground Sets
  • Low-Voltage Light Fixtures
  • Exposed Utility Cables
  • Outdoor Furniture
  • Vinyl, Wood or Aluminum Siding
  • Air Conditioner Condensers
  • Low-Growing Annual and/or Perennial Foliage
  • Aluminum Downspout Extensions

Please be sure to let us know if you have any questions or if our team at Pacocha Landscaping Services, Inc. can be of help in the creation of a beautiful, maintenance-friendly landscape at your property.  Thank you for visiting our site and have a great day!

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Poison Ivy……….. here, there and everywhere!!

Here are just a few locations where we have found poison ivy happily growing over the last few months.  Some areas fairly normal, others, not so much.

Poison Ivy found growing between a set of patio chairs!

 

Poison Ivy growing up a mature Maple tree!

 

Poison Ivy extending it’s reach into a neighbor’s property through a chain link fence!

 

Poison Ivy making it’s way up a shed wall and roof!

 

Poison Ivy quickly growing up a brick garage wall!

 

Poison Ivy sneaking up behind a barbecue grill!

 

Please contact Pacocha Landscaping Services, Inc. for help identifying and removing poison ivy found growing on your northwest suburban Chicago area property.  Thank you for visiting our site and have a great day!

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Yucca’s………the persistent perennial plant that will not leave without a fight!

While not very popular these days, yucca’s were a very common perennial found all over the Chicagoland area 20 plus years ago.  These plants are durable!!  They spread by rhizome and develop a deep tap root which makes them resilient to weather extremes, but very difficult to remove when the time comes for a change.  Because of their rather extreme deep growing tap root (sometimes over 15 feet into the ground!!) and vast network of spreading fiberous roots, they cannot be easily eradicated.

Talk about survival of the fittest……. Yucca’s have the physiology to endure and live seemingly forever!!

Even after the initial plant removal (digging out) has been completed, you can count on new plant regrowth 90% of the time.  When new yucca plants eventually sprout from the ground they can be pulled by hand, dug out as they appear or a non-selective systemic herbicide may be applied to eliminate the unwanted plants and their comprehensive underground root structure.

So, if you have these hardy perennials growing in your garden and want them removed, please plan on much digging and several growing seasons to finally achieve success.

Please be sure to contact Pacocha Landscaping Services, Inc. with any lawn maintenance, landscape renovation or snow removal service you need completed.  Thank you for visiting and have a great day!

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A fruit bearing perennial TOXIC WEED that has many unique uses dating back hundreds of years!!

One day a client asked if I would stop by his property to look at a few small projects he needed taken care of.  So during my property visit I noticed a very striking plant.  The client indicated that he did not plant it and asked me if I knew what it was.  I just shook my head and said I could not identify the plant off hand.  The plant had grown quite nicely in a small bed space just behind his house to a height of about 5′ tall, had beautiful deep red-purple colored stems and awesome long strands of berries.  I took a few pictures and performed a Google Image search later that evening.  It turned out that the mysterious plant was called Pokeweed and has a very long detailed history.

Pacocha - Pokeweed 3

I was amazed that this perennial “weed” had grown to be such a beautiful mature plant.

What really interested me besides the very unique color and berries produced by Pokeweed was that all parts of the plant itself are considered toxic and not recommended for human, pet and/or livestock consumption.  However, pokeweed berries and it’s dried roots have been used in herbal remedies, for red food coloring and even to make ink and dye.

Pokeweed Facts and Folklore:

  •  The common name ‘pokeweed’ originates from the Native American word for ‘blood’, referring to the red dye that can be made from the fruit (however, the color is difficult to fix). Some of the other common names, such as ‘inkberry’ and ‘inkweed’, refer to this use.Pacocha - Pokeweed 1
  • Juice from pokeweed berries was once used to ‘improve’ the color of cheap red wine.
  • Supporters of President James Polk wore pokeweed twigs instead of campaign buttons during the 1845 campaign.
  • Medical researchers have isolated a protein (pokeweed antiviral protein or PAP) from pokeweed that is being used to try to inhibit the replication of the HIV virus in human cells.
  • Roots, leaves and berries of common pokeweed were used medicinally by Native Americans and early settlers to treat a variety of conditions from hemorrhoids to headaches.
  • The young shoots and leaves of pokeweed have been eaten as greens (‘poke sallet’), boiled with the water changed several times prior to consumption. The taste is described as similar to that of asparagus or spinach. Berries have been used to make pie. However, ingestion of any part of common pokeweed cannot be recommended
  • Pacocha - Pokeweed 2

Please be sure to contact Pacocha Landscaping Services, Inc. with any questions, comments or ideas on how we can be of further assistance to you.  Thank you for taking the time to read our blog and have a great day!

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What exactly is a lawn and landscape spring cleanup anyway?

A seasonal spring cleanup is a one-time property visit to prepare your lawn and landscape for the up and coming growing season.

Normally our spring cleanup service includes the removal and off-site disposal of any landscape related surface debris, windblown trash, fallen twigs, etc. that may have accumulated over winter in plant beds, atop paved surfaces and across all lawn areas.  We will also cultivate the soil or wood mulch covering within specified plant beds, cut back various perennial plants, perform initial lawn mowing, all pavement will be mechanically edged and blown clean to complete.  It is also very common to perform mechanical lawn dethatching, core aeration and lawn fertilization in addition to a spring cleanup.

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