Tag Archives: Illinois

Before digging in Illinois be sure to call 811, JULIE 800-892-0123 or CHICAGO DIGGER 312-744-7000 to avoid buried utilities

Whether you are preparing to install a tree, pond, hedge, drainage system, new concrete or even a road side mailbox be sure to call 811 (or your local One-Call system) to learn if there are any buried utilities (electric, natural gas, communication cables, drinking water, sewer, etc.) nearby that will need to be avoided.Pacocha Landscaping Services, Inc.

  • JULIE, INC. 800-892-0123 – www.illinois1call.comHours: 24 hours, 7 days – Advance Notice: 2 working days minimum – Marks Valid: 28 calendar day

Different paint colors will be used to mark the various underground utilities found on your property.  It is very important to have a good idea as to what these colors represent.

  • RED: Red markings identify electric systems including high voltage and low voltage Pacocha Landscaping Services, Inc.power lines and wires.
  • YELLOW: Yellow is used to designate the approximate location of pipe systems which carry natural gas, oil, steam and petroleum products.
  • ORANGE: Orange marks identify the approximate location of communication type cabling networks.
  • BLUE: Blue marks identify the approximate location of pipes carrying drinking water.
  • PURPLE: Purple is used to mark reclaimed water, irrigation and slurry lines.  In many Pacocha Landscaping Services, Inc.cases these lines go unmarked by 811 notification services due to being on private property and owned by property owners.
  • GREEN: Green marks identify the approximate location of sewer and storm sewer pipes as well as other drain lines.
  • WHITE and PINK: White and pink are the only two colors in the APWA color code that do not designate the approximate location of underground lines on a job site.  White is commonly used to indicate proposed excavation and pink to mark temporary survey markings.

Please be sure to contact Pacocha Landscaping Services, Inc. with any questions or service requests.  Thank you for visiting our site!

 

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Which local flying insect loves stagnate water found in catch basins, rain gutters, plant containers, ditches and can spread disease as it feeds on blood?

Culex Pipiens or better known as the Northern House Mosquito!

I think we can all agree that mosquitoes are a nuisance pest that can make any considerable time spent outdoors very problematic.  As the weather warms and as routine rains occur prepare to encounter the dreaded mosquito.  Unlike tiny Midge flies that do not bite, mosquitoes (female Culex Pipiens in particular) can blood feed and spread diseases like West Nile Virus, St. Louis encephalitis, La Crosse encephalitis and other diseases.  Pacocha - Northern House MosquitoThey routinely lay eggs in temporary stagnate pools like catch basins, ditches, marshes, clogged rain gutters, planters and even in old water filled tires.  Basically any location where clean or polluted water can accumulate undisturbed for less than 2 weeks is all it takes.  Mosquitoes have 4 life stages; Egg, Larva, Pupa and Adult.  Since only the female mosquito blood feeds (sucks blood), it is critical for the female mosquito to acquire the needed protein (via blood) to produce eggs (50-400 eggs at a time).  Please keep in mind that female blood sucking mosquitoes not only feed on humans, but birds and animals as well.  Once mosquito eggs are laid they become larva in only 3 days.  Mosquitoes complete their life cycle (egg-larva-pupa-adult) in 7-10 days.  unexpected-effects-usa-drought-mosquitoEven the most effective mosquito control program cannot completely eliminate mosquitoes.  Mosquito populations can be reduced by eliminating breeding sites (if possible).  Mosquito bites and disease can be prevented through properly maintained window screens, protective clothing and repellents (containing DEET 10-30% most effective).  Mosquitoes are less attracted to white clothes than to dark colored clothes.  wheelbarrel full of waterControlling mosquito larva (primarily by removing stagnate water or by utilizing a larvacide) should be the primary goal of any mosquito management plan.  Control of adult mosquitoes can be accomplished by applying residual barrier treatments to reduce mosquitoes resting in vegetation during the day or by ground applied fogs (adulticiding) at dusk.  Even the best adulticide program will eliminate no more than 30% of the total adult mosquito population.  poolcoverwithwaterA good seasonal larvacide program is needed for best local area mosquito control.

 

 

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Do I have grubs? My lawn is under attack from skunks, crows and raccoon’s!

If you are one of the unlucky few this summer season that has discovered grub related lawn damage than please read on.  Everyone loves a beautiful healthy lawn that makes a property stand out, but you should know that your lawn can be destroyed in just a few days if white grubs (in particular) are allowed to feed freely on your lawn’s root zone.  Grubs are the larval stage (four stages of development = egg, larva, pupa and adult) of various scarab/flying beetles that call your lawn and landscape home.  The main beetle varieties found in Northern Illinois are the masked chafer and Japanese beetle.  Several other beetle varieties include Asiatic garden beetle, European chafer, green June beetle, May and June beetles and Oriental beetle.  Grubs can be described as dirty white colored, soft bodied, and robust with a brown head and six well-developed legs, with exception of green June beetle grubs, which do not have well developed legs.  When the turf is lifted to expose the grubs, they usually will be lying on their sides in a C-shaped position.  The life cycles of the above mentioned beetles are completed in 12 months with the exception of the common May or June beetle, which has a three-year life cycle.  Adult beetles lay eggs in the ground during the summer.  As soon as grubs hatch, they start feeding on the lawn roots until cold weather drives them two to eight inches deeper into the soil where they overwinter.  As temperatures warm in the spring, the grubs move up from the lower soil regions and resume feeding near the surface until they become mature and pupate from May through early-June.  Later emergence can occur and is dependent on local weather conditions.  Heavy white grub infestations can destroy grass roots, causing the affected area to become spongy, which allows the sod to be rolled back like a piece of carpet.  Even though grub infestations are not always obvious, damage is routinely discovered in spring (April or May) and late summer and fall (September and October).  When you see grub eating skunks, raccoon’s or crows in your yard you need to inspect your lawn to see if grub populations are beyond 5-10 grubs per square foot.  Please keep in mind that grubs do not typically appear in shade lawns.  Since adult beetles usually lay eggs in full-sun green lawn areas with adequate moisture, if your lawn is dry, dormant and/or poorly rooted you will have little risk of grub damage.  It is highly recommended to prevent grub damage by applying a preventative insecticide such as Imidacloprid (Merit) between late June and the beginning of August seasonally.  However, if no preventative insecticide is applied and a grub outbreak is discovered than a curative insecticide like Trichlorfon (Dylox) is highly recommended to prevent large scale turf damage.  If significant grub damage has occurred, the lawn will need some renovation work in early fall or the following spring to rebuild lawn density.  If you suspect your lawn has grubs, please contact Pacocha Landscaping Services, Inc. to schedule an on-site visit to have our team professionally analyze your lawn and offer control and repair recommendations for your review.

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