Tag Archives: Glyphosate

Bishop’s Weed……………….. friend or foe???

Bishop’s weed (aka goutweed, snow-on-the-mountain, ground elder, etc.) can take over your garden if you are not careful.  While the perennial plant itself looks fairly attractive, the challenge lies in it’s invasive growing nature.

The plant will quickly spread into just about any open soil area not bound by pavement on all four sides!!  This ground cover plant will spread, and spread, and spread………..

Bishop’s weed is nearly unstoppable!!

 

Bishop’s weed is considered a noxious weed in many states.  Just something to consider when deciding whether or not to offer a few of your Bishop’s weed plant’s to a neighbor or family member.  A non-selective herbicide (glyphosate) may be used to control the plant, but multiple targeted applications over several growing seasons may be required.

Please contact Pacocha Landscaping Services, Inc. with any questions you may have or to discuss your next landscape improvement project.  We greatly appreciate the opportunity and look forward to helping any way we can.  Thank you for visiting our site and have a great day!

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Types of Herbicides: Non-Selective VS. Selective

You need to know the difference between a non-selective and a selective herbicide before you perform or authorize any herbicide application on your property.

A non-selective herbicide kills all actively growing vegetation by contact or by a systemic mode of action (chemical transported throughout plant). As an example Round-Up (Glyphosate) is commonly used to kill all existing unwanted vegetation growing in a poorly maintained landscaped area before planting or installing desirable seed or mature plants shortly after. Residual weed control (pre-emergent herbicide, soil sterilants, etc.) should be considered when choosing the correct non-selective herbicide needed for a particular site specific vegetation control task at hand.

A selective herbicide kills only certain target plants (as specified on product label) and leaves behind all other plants virtually unscathed (dosage and timing of application dependent).  Most selective herbicides used on turf (in particular) are systemic in nature (chemical transported throughout plant).

A decision will need to be made if only a select few unwanted broadleaf weeds, grasses, vines, etc. need to be eliminated or if everything growing in a particular target area will need to be controlled.

As always, please consult an industry professional for proper target plant identification and best available control options (organic, synthetic, contact, systemic, dosage, mechanical, cultural, etc.) before any/all pesticide applications are performed.

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