Tag Archives: Core Aeration

Take a look at that Forsythia over there, it’s trying to tell you something………..

Spring is finally here!!

A sure sign that spring has finally arrived is when the forsythia bushes bloom and take on an awesome yellow color.  Even though the forsythia’s great vibrant yellow color only lasts a few short weeks, here are a few lawn and landscape related special events that it’s bloom usually signifies.

  • Soil temperatures are beginning to warm above 50 degrees+
  • Cool season turf grasses are finally beginning to grow.
  • Perennial broadleaf weeds, especially dandelions, are coming out of dormancy and are springing back to life!
  • Crabgrass seed will begin germinating in open, bare soil areas in the very near future.  Try to apply a grassy weed preventer at this time.
  • The odds of accumulating snow and/or sub-freezing temperatures are becoming less likely to occur from this point forward.  Winter is over!!
  • Lawn and landscape clean-ups, dethatching and core aeration should be well underway.
  • Irrigation systems are being opened/turned-on for the season.
  • Even though turf grass seed should be ideally planted in the late summer/early fall for best results, if planting in the spring, now would be the time to do so (next 4 weeks +/-).

Please be sure to contact Pacocha Landscaping Services, Inc. with any lawn or landscape related improvement project you would like completed.  Thank you for visiting our site and have a great spring and summer season!

Please follow and like us:

It’s much too hot and way too dry…….. will my lawn be ok?

The first cool-season lawn areas to show signs of heat related stress will likely consist of Kentucky bluegrass and fine fescue grass plant varieties.  Lawn areas that are not routinely watered, experience full-sun exposure or are found growing atop shallow heat-retaining objects (sewers, utilities, compacted materials, etc.) or alongside curbs, sewer covers, sign posts, etc. will go dormant first when temperatures hold in the mid-to-upper 90’s and moisture is non-existent.

In most cases, as cooler temperatures return and routine rainfall becomes the norm, your lawn will awaken from it’s dormancy and return to it’s beautiful self all on it’s own and without any additional help.  However, depending on the total duration and severity of the heat/drought experienced, season-end lawn repairs by seed may be needed to rebuild any/all lost lawn density.

Here are a few seasonal lawn care tips to remember when we experience severe heat and dry conditions

  • Try to keep foot, bicycle or vehicle traffic across all heat effected lawn areas to a bare minimum.
  • Water regularly all season long to ensure dormant-prone grass plant varieties thrive and survive.
  • If a routine watering program is not possible for any reason, do not begin to water your lawn sporadically after your lawn has already gone dormant.  Just let your lawn come out of dormancy on it’s own, over time and as cooler weather and routine rainfall allows.
  •  Mow lawn high (3.5″+/-) all season long for best overall grass plant health and to encourage critical root development.
  • Core aerate lawn every fall to relieve soil compaction and allow for improved air/nutrient/water flow to your lawns root zone.
  • Incorporate the planting of drought-tolerant cool season grass varieties into your seasonal lawn improvement program.

Please be sure to let our team at Pacocha Landscaping Services, Inc. know if we we can be of help or answer any questions you may have.  Thank you for visiting our site and have a great day!

Please follow and like us:

Weeds are growing in my newly seeded lawn …….. what to do?

When planting a new lawn from seed (in particular), soil is normally added, amended, cultivated and/or aerated to provide optimum seed-growing conditions.  Lightly cultivated soil is critical for new grass seed germination and eventual plant/root development, but also happens to be the “open door” needed for any/all competing nearby weed seed to flourish.

Here are a few precautions that can be taken to lessen the possibility of unwanted weed growth within your improved soil/new lawn area.

1). If attempting to grow grass within an area that already has a large population of weeds (broadleaf, grassy or grass-like weeds) consider applying a selective or non-selective herbicide to all unwanted growing vegetation a few weeks before soil preparation/seed planting takes place to completely eliminate the problematic weeds found (roots and all).

2). Plant grass seed in late summer/early fall to avoid increased spring season weed seed competition.

3). Use a premium blend of site-specific grass seed that contains 0% weed/noxious weed seed.

4). Consider mechanical slit-seeding (when existing site and soil conditions allow) to plant new grass seed directly into the soil through an existing stand of turf grass.

5). When planting grass seed in large lightly cultivated soil areas, consider covering all newly planted areas with seed germination blanket to lessen the exposure to wind-blown weed seed, feeding birds, etc..

If all precautions were taken, but a few problematic broadleaf weeds still happened to grow within your newly seeded areas, no problem at all.  Here are a few simple steps that can be taken to eradicate the unwanted weeds found growing in your prized new lawn.  If a small area, just manually pull any/all weeds found as they appear.  If a larger area, spot treat the visible broadleaf weed foliage with a selective liquid herbicide to completely eliminate the weed (root and all).  As lawn density builds over time, weed competition will become less problematic due to less bare soil exposure.

Just remember, planting or repairing a lawn from seed is not a quick proposition and without it’s fair share of short term challenges (maintenance, irrigation, environmental conditions, etc.).  However, it is our continued opinion that planting a site specific lawn from premium disease resistant grass seed is the very best way to grow a healthy stand of turf grass that will eventually prove worth the wait.  Please consider Pacocha Landscaping Services, Inc. for your next lawn improvement project.  Thank you for visiting our site and have a great day!

Please follow and like us:

Watch out for RUST…….. ON YOUR LAWN!!!

Yes, lawn rust!

When we hear the word rust we usually think of deteriorating steel or iron somewhere in our local surroundings.  However, you may be interested to learn more about a common lawn disease that shares the same name.  Whether it be the tell-tale sign of your shoes turning orange when walking across the lawn or the lawn taking on a semi-faded orange color, your lawn is likely dealing with this common late summer fungal related disease called lawn rust.

Pacocha - Lawn Rust on Shoe

Here are a few lawn rust specifics for your review.

  1. Shoes become orange colored when walking across the lawn (orange/brown/rust colored powder sticks to shoes)
  2. Lawn takes on a temporary rusty color (entirely or in patches)
  3. Usually found during late summer/early fall season Pacocha - Rust on Blade of Kentucky Bluegrass
  4. Very common when lawn has gone dormant (partially or fully)
  5. Disease very likely when high humidity AND high temperatures are the norm
  6. In severe cases, rust disease may thin overall lawn (although not very common).  Plant premium site-specific grass seed to rebuild lost density as needed.
  7. Core aerate and/or mechanically power rake all lawn areas to break down/remove problematic excess thatch
  8. Perform infrequent watering and continue lawn fertilization (nitrogen in particular) to speed recovery

Please be sure to contact Pacocha Landscaping Services, Inc. with any questions or service requests you may have.  Thank you for visiting our site and have a great day!

Pacocha Landscaping Services Logo

Please follow and like us:

Mark, flag or map all shallow buried utilities BEFORE core aerating your lawn to avoid possible damage

Pacocha - AeratorAs winter ends and spring finally starts, many property owners will have their lawn’s core aerated.  Core aeration is the mechanical process of repeatedly penetrating the lawn/soil with a machine that removes a great many soil cores (1/2″ diameter x 2″-4″ deep) to further improve air, water and nutrient flow to the lawn’s root system.  Core aeration is great for relieving soil compaction and improving grass seed germination rates (when overseeding Pacocha - Aeration Soil Cores– pre or post aeration).  Even though core aeration is quite beneficial for your lawn’s health, the mechanical process itself can be very detrimental to any/all shallow (< 6″) unmarked underground utilities that are not avoided.

Here are a few of the most common underground “non-exposed” utilities that must be marked, flagged and/or mapped before core aerating your lawn.Pacocha - Underground Electric Dog Fence

  1. Sprinkler heads that have been overgrown by grass
  2. Shallow buried internet/tv cable lines
  3. Shallow buried “invisible” pet fencing systems
  4. Shallow buried electrical power lines (non-conduit encased in particular) feeding post lights, pond pumps, etc.
  5. Shallow buried landscape drainage or downspout extension linesPet fence wire_in_trench
  6. Grass covered landscape drain outlets, grates, pop-up emitters, etc.
  7. Lawn covered access covers for underground flood control systems
  8. Shallow buried low voltage wiring (landscape lighting, holiday decorations, irrigation system sensors, etc.)

Please remember, if the operator controlling Pacocha - Underground Drain Line with Pop Up Emitterthe core aerator cannot see an obstacle across the lawn or has not been informed of it’s shallow underground existence, there is a very good chance that the steel tines below the core aerator will contact, break or severe the hidden buried object.

Please be sure to contact Pacocha landscaping Services, Inc. to learn more about the process of core aerification and it’s many benefits.  Thank you for your interest!

 

 

Please follow and like us: