Category Archives: Landscape Improvements

Before and After – Back Yard Children’s Playground Area

We had the opportunity recently to assist a client of ours further improve their back yard by installing a multi-course treated wood timber surround for their new children’s playground set.

Since the site was situated on a slight incline and a generous layer of playground wood mulch was needed (under/around play set), we called for the use of a fairly substantial outlying edge material (6 x 6 wood timbers) to retain the special playground mulch and keep the area looking great for many years to come.

To begin, we cleared and leveled a portion of the sloping back yard area slated to receive the new play set (first site visit).  Shortly after the play set was installed (by an outside company), we returned to construct a two course 6 x 6 treated wood timber surround (size of area determined by client).  We first excavated, leveled and manually compacted the select path ways where wood timbers were to be installed.  The first timber course was secured to soil using 24″ long steel rebar rods.  We used 16′ long 6 x 6 wood timbers to eliminate as many short wood timber pieces (visible butt joints) as possible.  The second, final top wood timber course was secured to base course below using construction adhesive first and then 10″ long timber screws were used (spaced several feet apart) to properly bind the structure together.  Steel angle brackets, mending plate, etc. were also used (completely hidden from view) to further reinforce corners and joints between timbers.  Any/all cut timber’s were treated with a special end-grain sealer to further improve the structural integrity/life expectancy of our ground contacting wood timbers.  Lastly, landscape barrier/weed control fabric was attached to soil within enclosed play area (ensuring excellent soil-to-mulch separation) before a layer of playground mulch (Safe T Mat Certified Playground Mulch) was added to complete.

Please be sure to contact Pacocha Landscaping Services, Inc. with any questions or project ideas you have.  We would love to help anyway we can.  Thank you for visiting our site and have a great day!

Please follow and like us:
error

What happened to our boxwood’s this past winter?!?!??

As anyone with a watchful eye on area plants and trees can probably tell you, this past winter, with it’s extreme cold (Polar Vortex!!), really took it’s toll on many deciduous and evergreen bushes.  In particular, the beautiful broadleaf evergreen, the boxwood, has been decimated!!

So many mature boxwood’s, that managed to survive for so many years, so many weather extreme’s, just could not pull through the brutally cold winter of 2018-19.

Although we can’t bring back the majority of stressed boxwood’s found today, we can learn from the experience and improve our chances for successful long-term growing of new and/or existing boxwood’s that survived last winter.

A few points to consider when growing boxwood’s in your landscape.

  • Encourage deep root growth by watering deeply, less often.
  • Keep your boxwood’s (soil/root zone) watered very well going into winter, before ground freezes.
  • Maintain a 2″+/- layer of organic water absorbing mulch around the base of your boxwood’s to further assist in retaining moisture (refresh as needed).
  • Be critical of the area you are planting/growing boxwood’s.  If deicing material is routinely applied nearby, try to limit exposure whenever possible or simply plant further away from problematic areas.  Salt (sodium chloride) dissolved in water, if concentrations are high enough, will contaminate the soil in adjacent run-off areas over time.
  • Install physical winter barriers/screens around your boxwood’s and other sensitive plants to keep deicing salt out of soil and to reduce moisture-robbing winter wind exposure (winter foliage desiccation).
  • If boxwood’s prove to be too sensitive for a particular area, try a different plant.  Choose a plant that can tolerate the specific conditions of the site for best long term results.

Please be sure to contact Pacocha Landscaping Services, Inc. with any questions you may have or for further assistance.  We would love to help anyway we can.  Thank you for visiting our site and have a great day!

Please follow and like us:
error

Yucca’s………the persistent perennial plant that will not leave without a fight!

While not very popular these days, yucca’s were a very common perennial found all over the Chicagoland area 20 plus years ago.  These plants are durable!!  They spread by rhizome and develop a deep tap root which makes them resilient to weather extremes, but very difficult to remove when the time comes for a change.  Because of their rather extreme deep growing tap root (sometimes over 15 feet into the ground!!) and vast network of spreading fiberous roots, they cannot be easily eradicated.

Talk about survival of the fittest……. Yucca’s have the physiology to endure and live seemingly forever!!

Even after the initial plant removal (digging out) has been completed, you can count on new plant regrowth 90% of the time.  When new yucca plants eventually sprout from the ground they can be pulled by hand, dug out as they appear or a non-selective systemic herbicide may be applied to eliminate the unwanted plants and their comprehensive underground root structure.

So, if you have these hardy perennials growing in your garden and want them removed, please plan on much digging and several growing seasons to finally achieve success.

Please be sure to contact Pacocha Landscaping Services, Inc. with any lawn maintenance, landscape renovation or snow removal service you need completed.  Thank you for visiting and have a great day!

Please follow and like us:
error

When growing grass, soil preparation is EVERYTHING!

Whenever repairing or installing a new lawn from seed or sod, one very important aspect of the planting process is soil preparation.  Besides using premium fresh site-specific grass seed or sod, avoiding the hot and dry season (if possible) and ensuring routine irrigation, the better the initial soil preparation is, the better the outcome will most certainly be.

Here are a few soil preparation tips that will ensure success when planting grass from seed and/or sod.

GRASS SEED

Before planting grass seed over an existing weakened stand of grass, be sure to core aerate first to open the existing soil, relieve compaction and allow for improved seed-to-soil contact.  Better yet, mechanically power rake the lawn first (spring or fall preferred) to scarify the soil surface and to remove debris and excess thatch.  Once dethatched, core aerate (single or multiple passes ok) then spread grass seed over prepared surface by walk behind drop/broadcast spreader or plant seed directly into soil via mechanical slit-seeder.

If planting grass seed across bare ground be sure to cultivate/roto-till the existing soil first.  Before adding any/all amendments, starter fertilizer or additional top soil, for large open widespread areas, use a front or rear tine tiller to cultivate the soil to a depth of 2″-4″ first.  For small spot-repair areas use a steel rake, cultivator or even a Garden Weasel to cultivate the soil manually.  Once all bare soil areas have been cultivated and soil compaction has been broken, rake loosened soil to level and grade adequately across site to ensure proper drainage, etc..

Add pulverized top soil (as/if needed) to further improve/elevate areas targeted for eventual seed planting to complete.

SOD

Assuming that we are starting with a bare ground situation where all existing unwanted grass has either been manually, mechanically or chemically removed prior to new sod installation, bare compacted soil needs to be adequately cultivated before new sod can be successfully grown.  Again, just like when planting grass seed across large open areas, roto-tilling is the preferred method of soil preparation.

Once all bare soil areas have been roto-tilled/cultivated (depth of 2″-4″ ideal), add amendments, fertilizer or additional pulverized top soil to prepare the site for new sod installation.

Take your time, be thorough in your soil preparation and you will have a beautiful new lawn in no time!

Please be sure to consider Pacocha Landscaping Services, Inc. for your next grass planting project.  We are happy to answer any questions you may have and help any way we can.  Thank you for visiting our site and have a great day!

Please follow and like us:
error

Take a look at that Forsythia over there, it’s trying to tell you something………..

Spring is finally here!!

A sure sign that spring has finally arrived is when the forsythia bushes bloom and take on an awesome yellow color.  Even though the forsythia’s great vibrant yellow color only lasts a few short weeks, here are a few lawn and landscape related special events that it’s bloom usually signifies.

  • Soil temperatures are beginning to warm above 50 degrees+
  • Cool season turf grasses are finally beginning to grow.
  • Perennial broadleaf weeds, especially dandelions, are coming out of dormancy and are springing back to life!
  • Crabgrass seed will begin germinating in open, bare soil areas in the very near future.  Try to apply a grassy weed preventer at this time.
  • The odds of accumulating snow and/or sub-freezing temperatures are becoming less likely to occur from this point forward.  Winter is over!!
  • Lawn and landscape clean-ups, dethatching and core aeration should be well underway.
  • Irrigation systems are being opened/turned-on for the season.
  • Even though turf grass seed should be ideally planted in the late summer/early fall for best results, if planting in the spring, now would be the time to do so (next 4 weeks +/-).

Please be sure to contact Pacocha Landscaping Services, Inc. with any lawn or landscape related improvement project you would like completed.  Thank you for visiting our site and have a great spring and summer season!

Please follow and like us:
error

Ideas to relieve standing water from your lawn and landscape

If proper site drainage is lacking at your property and continuous rains routinely cause the ground to become fully saturated, standing water will almost certainly occur.

Especially across low lying lawn and poorly drained plant bed areas, if surface water is left to stagnate for long periods of time, non-tolerant plants may fall victim to the negative effects of excessive soil moisture (root decay/wet-feet).

Here are a few ways to relieve standing water at your property.

  • Redirect existing roof downspouts and/or sump pump outlet pipes to flow toward alternate non-problematic areas (if possible).
  • Raise the soil grade within low-lying flood prone areas.
  • Install an underground drainage system to properly relocate, store and/or further improve the natural process of ground water percolation.
  • Replace impermeable paved surfaces with porous materials.
  • Fine tune your irrigation system to prevent over watering (soil type and natural rainfall frequency dependent).
  • If you suspect a neighboring property is the direct cause of your drainage problem, begin a direct discussion with it’s owner and/or the local government to find a beneficial solution.
  • If poor drainage cannot be improved for whatever reason, consider planting species that can tolerate wet soil conditions.

Please be sure to contact Pacocha Landscaping Services, Inc. with any questions you may have.  We greatly appreciate your time and look forward to being of assistance to you in the very near future.  Thank you for visiting our site and have a great day!

Please follow and like us:
error

A tree that has no equal – the majestic Bur Oak!

Bur Oak Deeply Furrowed Bark

There is one very special oak tree that I just love seeing in my day-to-day travels, the Bur oak.

Wow…. what a beautiful and majestic tree!

The Bur oak is from the white oak family of hard wood trees and can live well over 200 years.  It’s bark is deeply furrowed and acorns sport a very unique hairy cap.

When you find a Bur oak acorn on the ground, look up.  Take a look at one of the most beautiful oak trees you will find in our area.  Young, smaller sized wild growing Bur oak trees are difficult to transplant due to their very substantial tap root, but if you can wait a few years and have a few viable acorns you can plant your very own oak tree from seed.

The tree can grow well over 70 feet tall and is ideally suited to grow in a vast open area.  However, with that said, we have a few clients that have several very substantial Bur oak’s that are happily growing right alongside their homes and driveways.  Whether the trees came before the house or the house before the trees, I don’t know, but what I do know is that their landscapes are truly one-of-a-kind.

In my opinion, these substantial trees add so much character to a landscape that their is simply no comparison. If you are fortunate enough to have towering mature Bur oaks growing on your property, consider yourself very lucky.  Besides having to clean up occasional acorns and an abundance of leaves in the fall you will find no better shade tree.  If you have the foresight and space available on your property, be sure to look into planting your very own Bur oak tree.  Your kids and grandchildren will be very grateful you did.

Bur Oak Acorns

Please be sure to consider Pacocha Landscaping Services, Inc. for your lawn, landscape and snow management needs.  Thank you for visiting our site and have a great day!

Please follow and like us:
error

Oak Tree = Living Heirloom

It seems that the older I become the more I appreciate trees that manage to survive the test of time.  Oak trees in particular are hardwood trees that can easily outlive us by several generations.  

pacocha-large-oak-tree

Please find a few distinguishing traits that may help you select and plant just the right oak tree for your property.

  • Oak trees are divided in two main groups, white or red oakpacocha-red-and-white-oak-tree-groups
  • Oak trees are deciduous hardwood trees
  • There are nearly 60 different oak tree varieties that are native to the United States
  • White oak leaves have rounded lobes where red oaks generally have leaves that have pointed lobes
  • Oak trees first produce acorns after they reach 20 to 30 years of age
  • White oaks generally have lighter gray colored bark where red oak trees have dark colored bark
  • Fall transplanted oak tree sapling
    Fall transplanted oak tree sapling

    Oak trees can live several hundred years

  • Oak trees have a very substantial tap root that grows deep underground. Most lateral growing oak tree roots are found just under the soil surface (18 inches +/- deep @ 6 to 7 times width of tree canopy)
  • Oaks can grow to become 60 to over 100 feet tall
  • Oak tree canopies can spread 40-70 feet wide
  • White oak trees are slow growers, only 1 foot +/- per year. Red oaks can grow up to 2 feet per year
  • Oak trees like well drained soils
  • Ideally, try to plant an oak tree at least 20 feet away from houses and other structures.
  • Never plant an oak tree under power lines.

Please be sure to contact Pacocha Landscaping Services, Inc. with any questions you may have or if we can help in any other way.  Thank you for visiting and have a great day!

Pacocha Landscaping Services Logo

Please follow and like us:
error

What is a pop-up drainage emitter anyway?

Pacocha - PVC Drain Fitted with Pop Up Drain EmitterWhen installing an extended underground downspout or sump pump drain, it is always a good idea to direct excess discharged water away from your foundation and into a water safe area several feet away (open lawn area, french drain, dry well, etc.).

Pacocha - Pop Up Emitter AttachmentA great way to finish off the open outlet point of a buried corrugated or PVC drain pipe (directed to an open lawn area – in particular) is with a pop-up drainage emitter cover.  Unlike a standard round grate type drain cover which may allow soil and small debris to flow back into the buried pipe, Pacocha - EZ Flow to Corrugated to Pop Up Drainage Emitter Covera pop-up emitter is a clean looking alternative that remains closed until passing water pressure forces it open.  They blend nicely into any lawn area (green color) and are the perfect outlet cover for any 3″ to 6″ diameter buried drain pipe installation.

Thank you for visiting our site and please be sure to contact Pacocha Landscaping Services, Inc. with any questions or service requests you may have.  Have a great day!

Pacocha Landscaping Services Logo

Please follow and like us:
error

Tri-Color Beech …… what a unique tree!!

Pacocha - Tri Color Beech TreeIf I have to name one tree as my favorite, it has to be a European Tri-Color Beech.

Pacocha - Tri Color Beech Tree LeavesThey are such beautiful trees with their colorful variegated leaves (sometimes pink-white-purple-green or rose colored) which make it a complete stand-out in the landscape.  They like part shade and do not fare well in full sun exposed areas.  Try to avoid mid-day sun (in particular) when deciding where to plant.  Due to their somewhat shallow root system, slightly moist well drained soil becomes critical to their long term survival.  They are slow growing trees, but try to give them adequate space to grow and spread out a bit (Max 30′ height – Max 20′ spread).  Pacocha - Tri Color Beech Trees at NurseryBe sure to purchase from a reputable nursery for the best quality plant possible.

If you can find just the right spot in your landscape, I highly recommend planting a European Tri-Color Beech tree!Pacocha - Tri Color Beech Tree Leaf Close Up

Thank you for visiting and please be sure to contact Pacocha Landscaping Services, Inc. with any questions you may have.  Have a great day!

Pacocha Landscaping Services Logo

Please follow and like us:
error